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What else is there - Seriously

Discussion in 'Support Subforum' started by eskimoeskimo, Aug 7, 2020.

  1. Balsa11

    Balsa11 Well known member

    Enjoy something, anything, just because you enjoy it and for no other reason. Right brain feedback.

    I'm also working on feeling feelings instead of fighting them.
     
    RogueWave likes this.
  2. tgirl

    tgirl Well known member

    RogueWave, since you are a doctor I’m wondering if you might be able to answer this question. It would be appreciated if anyone who has any idea would post. I realize that stress hormones and learned neural pathways are basically what causes mind/body pain, but why is it that one person will be plagued by prickly leg skin, another dizziness, another pelvic pain and so on? This question pops into my head and causes me some uneasiness. It seems some suffer from run of the mill pain and others from strange symptoms. Thanks for any input.
     
    miffybunny and Idearealist like this.
  3. RogueWave

    RogueWave Well known member

    Also a great question, and one I can’t answer for certain, other than to say there may be some genetics involved in sensitive/weak areas.

    Ultimately it is the constant overstimulation of the parasympathetic system (which controls most of what is going on in your body) that causes these problems. Take a look at what the PNS governs, and it will explain just about every possible TMS symptom.
     
    Balsa11, tgirl and BloodMoon like this.
  4. miffybunny

    miffybunny Beloved Grand Eagle

    My understanding of why people get specific symptoms in specific areas are essentially "No one knows". There are 6 plausible explanations though:

    1.). Prior injury or surgery: The brain can latch on to an injury that occurred when the person was in a stressed negative emotional state. Chronic symptoms ensue.

    2.). Something that "runs in the family": something they grew up with ( a mom who had migraines or family members who suffered from certain conditions) and they heard about or witnessed a lot. This makes a person suggestible.

    3.) Association with repetitive mechanical work: typing, bending down a lot (things people do in their work for example)

    4.) Reading about a condition (contagious symptoms)

    5.) Symbolic : foot pain (can't "stand something"), pain in the neck (someone or something is a "pain in their neck"), pain in the butt ("a pain in the butt" lol")

    6.). An area that means a lot to a person ( a pianist and their hands, a runner with foot or leg pain, an area they are vain about, an area attached to feelings of sexuality)
     
    RogueWave, Balsa11 and tgirl like this.
  5. tgirl

    tgirl Well known member

    Thanks to both of you for your responses. I think for me, I’ve always had a fear of neurological disease. Nothing terrifies me more, so my present symptoms have sent me to three different neurologists, who have found nothing. My previous symptom was light headedness that dissipated on its own. That also caused me to have testing and see a neurologist, who again, found nothing. I even remember telling my physician decades ago that I had weird feelings in my feet, and he said I was fine, so it went away.
     
    Balsa11 likes this.
  6. miffybunny

    miffybunny Beloved Grand Eagle

    Just want to add another factor which is somatic pathways. There are 3 main categories of anxiety pathways and symptoms that Dr. Alan Abbass outlines. The 3 categories in order of severity are: Voluntary Muscle (pain in feet, legs, neck shoulders, chest, abdomen etc). Smooth Muscle (bladder, bowels, migraines) and Cognitive Perceptual (visual blurring, fainting reduced hearing, confusion, dissociation,). The neurological symptoms are directly correlated to the severity of the anxiety and emotional processes. This is probably also why back pain (and similar things that send people to chiropractors, orthopedists and surgeons) is the most common in America. It's big business here.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2021
    RogueWave and Balsa11 like this.
  7. Balsa11

    Balsa11 Well known member

    Find something you love about yourself and build on it
     
    RogueWave likes this.
  8. tgirl

    tgirl Well known member

    That makes sense Miffybunny, but where does nerve ending pain come into this equation? I’ve read about a number of people healing from these sorts of symptoms. It would almost seem as though an over stimulated mind has activated them.
     
    Balsa11 likes this.
  9. Balsa11

    Balsa11 Well known member

    Just another symptom
     
  10. miffybunny

    miffybunny Beloved Grand Eagle

    Nerve pain is simply in the 3rd category which indicates the highest level of anxiety. I had full blown CRPS which as you know, is just an extreme form of TMS. It just means that your brain is in higher state of fight or flight but it's no less reversible than any other manifestation of anxiety. All chronic pain stems from the brain and all sensations are created by the brain...whether they be burning, stabbing, throbbing, tensing, clenching, spasming, itching, swelling, blindness, dizziness, allodynia, hyperalgesia, dystonia, G. I. issues, phantom limb etc. etc. etc. It's all the same. The brain can create all manner of symptoms in virtually any area of the body. They come and go, wax and wane, get better and worse, move to other locations, stay fixed in the same spot. Get triggered by movement, activities, places, people, weather, clothes, food, light, computer screens. None of that matters one single iota. It's all dynamic pain and all reversible.
     
  11. Idearealist

    Idearealist Peer Supporter

    Nah, that's totally not me all day every day... :) I don't have it in me to properly reply to such an excellent post, but know that it's much appreciated. I feel like this mega thread is valuable, and could potentially be even more so in the future.
     
    RogueWave likes this.
  12. Idearealist

    Idearealist Peer Supporter

    I've still been walking A LOT every day and lifting/doing calisthenics a few times a week. It helps, but I tend to dwell on how much fitness I've lost in the last year. Last January I could do sets of 15 pullups with relative ease; now typing on a keyboard seems like a Herculean feat. How the mighty have fallen...

    And yeah, labels are only useful until they're redundant or feed into limiting beliefs. I'll try to avoid using them unless absolutely necessary, lol.
     
  13. RogueWave

    RogueWave Well known member

    When people tell me things like this, I always tell them ‘ok, that might be true, but it’s just for now.’ So anytime you catch yourself thinking/feeling that, add ‘just for now’ onto it. I heard one of the Navy SEALS talk about their training, and when someone would say they wanted to quit, he’d tell them ‘ok, but quit tomorrow.’

    You know your body is strong, because it’s been there before, and it can regain that strength.

    Let go of anything with the past, it’s a waste of time and will only fuel the despair. Catch yourself when you do this, and shift it ASAP.
     
    BloodMoon and Idearealist like this.
  14. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    It's not that this doesn't make any sense to me. It's that this has always sounded plausible, and so it's what I've tried again and again. I don't know how else I can try. Good chemicals, hope, confidence ... I wish. I have done the imagination exercise thousands of times. Ozanich and Moseley recommend something similar. I don't know @RogueWave. I appreciate you trying, and trying again. I do.
     
  15. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    It's to the point the Dr. Schubiner is recommending I try psychedelic drugs
     
    Idearealist likes this.
  16. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    Me too. And out loud in this thread too, no less
     
    Kozas and Idearealist like this.
  17. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    I really can't find any piece of me that still holds onto some hope that I can get better. I'm touched that you all should care so much to try to encourage me, but I can't find any hope. I've done this so many times.
     
  18. RogueWave

    RogueWave Well known member

    This is not a prescription, and it’s beyond this forum, but yes, in a professional, controlled environment, I’ve seen psychedelics work miracles in some very difficult cases.

    However, make sure you are well-prepared (do your homework first!!), and understand that you will still need to ‘do the work’ that we are discussing here.
     
    TrustIt and BloodMoon like this.
  19. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    I have done them already. Dr. Schubiner suggesting it now just freaked me out ... as it gives me the sense that he's grasping at straws and really has no idea why TMS stuff hasn't worked for me.
     
  20. Miller

    Miller Peer Supporter

    @eskimoeskimo I wouldn't let it freak you out to be honest, my husband has suggested psychedelics to me on multiple occasions. I think Dr Schubiner can see that it's difficult for you to keep putting the work in to change your brain without seeing results, so he's suggesting something that would have quite an immediate impact and give you the "refresh" that you need to start moving in the right direction. Some people find this easier than others.
     
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